FUCK YEAH, QUEER VINTAGE

Giving you all the queerness you've ever wanted since the 20th century (and before)

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artqueer:

Master of the Prayer Books of around 1500: Amour kissing the Lover, Detail of a miniature from “Roman de la Rose” by Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, c.1490-1500

artqueer:

Master of the Prayer Books of around 1500: Amour kissing the Lover, Detail of a miniature from “Roman de la Rose” by Guillaume de Lorris and Jean de Meun, c.1490-1500

6,624 notes

queermuseum:

Queer African American Women and the History of Marriage 
This photo and headline accompanied an article from the October 15, 1970 issue of Jet magazine. They reveal that long before the recent struggle for marriage equality began,  African American women who love women have engaged with the institution of marriage and have fought to make it their own.
Edna Knowles, on the left, and Peaches Stevens were wed in Liz’s Mark III Lounge, a gay bar on the South Side of Chicago, “before a host of friends and well wishers.” The article ended by noting, “although the duo has a type of ‘marriage license’ in their possession, the state’s official marriage license bureau reported it had no record of their license.” This ending serves to remind Jet readers that Knowles and Stevens’ union was not legitimate in the eyes of the state, as does the use of quotes around the word “married” in the headline.
However, decades prior to this bold public display of queer affection, African American female couples in New York strategized alternative ways to obtain marriage licenses in the 1920s and 30s:
“Marriage ceremonies were held with large wedding parties which included several bridesmaids, attendants, and other wedding party members. Actual marriage licenses were obtained by either masculinizing the first name, or having a gay male surrogate obtain the license for the marrying couple. These marriage licenses were placed on file with the New York City Marriage Bureau.” - Luvenia Pinson, “The Black Lesbian: Times Past-Time Present,” Womanews, May 1980  p. 8.
Also during the 1930s, popular performer Gladys Bentley was making a living singing bawdy tunes and playing piano late into the night at various clubs all over New York, including one named after her.

Bentley married her white girlfriend in Atlantic City in a ceremony to which she invited friends in the entertainment industry:
“Columnist Louis Sobol remembered Bentley coming over to his table one night and whispering, ‘I’m getting married tomorrow and you’re invited.’ When Sobol asked who the lucky man was to be, she giggled and replied, ‘Man? Why boy you’re crazy. I’m marryin’ ——’ and she named another woman singer.” - Eric Garber, “Gladys Bentley: The Bulldagger Who Sang the Blues,” Out/Look, Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 52-61.
These examples show some of the various ways queer African American women have created public rituals to express their relationships and have therefore insisted on their rights to full citizenship, many decades prior to the current struggle for marriage equality. 


- Cookie
 

queermuseum:

Queer African American Women and the History of Marriage 

This photo and headline accompanied an article from the October 15, 1970 issue of Jet magazine. They reveal that long before the recent struggle for marriage equality began,  African American women who love women have engaged with the institution of marriage and have fought to make it their own.

Edna Knowles, on the left, and Peaches Stevens were wed in Liz’s Mark III Lounge, a gay bar on the South Side of Chicago, “before a host of friends and well wishers.” The article ended by noting, “although the duo has a type of ‘marriage license’ in their possession, the state’s official marriage license bureau reported it had no record of their license.” This ending serves to remind Jet readers that Knowles and Stevens’ union was not legitimate in the eyes of the state, as does the use of quotes around the word “married” in the headline.

However, decades prior to this bold public display of queer affection, African American female couples in New York strategized alternative ways to obtain marriage licenses in the 1920s and 30s:

“Marriage ceremonies were held with large wedding parties which included several bridesmaids, attendants, and other wedding party members. Actual marriage licenses were obtained by either masculinizing the first name, or having a gay male surrogate obtain the license for the marrying couple. These marriage licenses were placed on file with the New York City Marriage Bureau.” - Luvenia Pinson, “The Black Lesbian: Times Past-Time Present,” Womanews, May 1980  p. 8.

Also during the 1930s, popular performer Gladys Bentley was making a living singing bawdy tunes and playing piano late into the night at various clubs all over New York, including one named after her.

Gladys Bentley

Bentley married her white girlfriend in Atlantic City in a ceremony to which she invited friends in the entertainment industry:

“Columnist Louis Sobol remembered Bentley coming over to his table one night and whispering, ‘I’m getting married tomorrow and you’re invited.’ When Sobol asked who the lucky man was to be, she giggled and replied, ‘Man? Why boy you’re crazy. I’m marryin’ ——’ and she named another woman singer.” - Eric Garber, “Gladys Bentley: The Bulldagger Who Sang the Blues,” Out/Look, Vol. 1, No. 1, Spring 1988, pp. 52-61.

These examples show some of the various ways queer African American women have created public rituals to express their relationships and have therefore insisted on their rights to full citizenship, many decades prior to the current struggle for marriage equality. 
- Cookie

 

(via leerans)

16 notes

contemphop-deactivated20130614 asked: I don't know if this is intentional or not, but it seems that there is a pretty clear lesbian/trans bias. 9 out of 10 posts depict either lesbian or trans stories/images. In my opinion, there should be more equal representation, unless the case is that you just run across lesbian and trans media more often, but I think it's fair to ask for more posts about vintage gay men. I love the blog but I just want more that relates to me as a gay male-identified person. Thank you!

It’s just what I run across more often. I reblog what I find and don’t have any particular biases towards one type of image. There was a time on this blog where it WAS mostly vintage gay men. Lately I’ve been finding more lesbian and trans* related things.

It’s also important to note that trans* and gay aren’t mutually exclusive, either. 

If you want to see more of a particular type of image on this blog, though, submit! 

650 notes

historical-nonfiction:


Stella (Ernest Boulton) was Victorian England’s most beautiful female impersonator, Fanny (Frederick Park) her inseparable companion. Stella was lauded for her beautiful soprano voice, and had a lengthy relationship with Lord Arthur Pelham-Clinton. Stella and Fanny were arrested in London in 1871, charged “with conspiring and inciting persons to commit an unnatural offence.” There was a sensational trial, but the prosecution.failed to prove they had anal sex, then a crime, or that crossdressing was a crime.

historical-nonfiction:

Stella (Ernest Boulton) was Victorian England’s most beautiful female impersonator, Fanny (Frederick Park) her inseparable companion. Stella was lauded for her beautiful soprano voice, and had a lengthy relationship with Lord Arthur Pelham-Clinton. Stella and Fanny were arrested in London in 1871, charged “with conspiring and inciting persons to commit an unnatural offence.” There was a sensational trial, but the prosecution.failed to prove they had anal sex, then a crime, or that crossdressing was a crime.

(via bulletprooffabulous)

106 notes

My beau and I are trying to win a photo shoot inspired by this vintage butch/femme photo from 1902! We can use all the votes we can get and would appreciate your click. Vote here: http://bit.ly/XXwR5N
Thank you!

My beau and I are trying to win a photo shoot inspired by this vintage butch/femme photo from 1902! We can use all the votes we can get and would appreciate your click. Vote here: http://bit.ly/XXwR5N

Thank you!

5,705 notes

thugzmansion:

Happy Black History Month!Marsha P Johnson and why she rules
She was an American transgender rights activist, Queen of Stonewall and Transgender Revolutionary.
She was a co-founder,  Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.) in the early 1970s and became the “mother” of S.T.A.R. House along with Sylvia Rivera, getting together food and clothing to help support the young trans women living in the house on the lower East Side of New York.

thugzmansion:

Happy Black History Month!

Marsha P Johnson and why she rules

  • She was an American transgender rights activist, Queen of Stonewall and Transgender Revolutionary.
  • She was a co-founder,  Street Transvestite Action Revolutionaries (S.T.A.R.) in the early 1970s and became the “mother” of S.T.A.R. House along with Sylvia Rivera, getting together food and clothing to help support the young trans women living in the house on the lower East Side of New York.

(Source: lesbian-app, via mercy-misrule)